Recent Changes

Saturday, June 5

  1. page Mental Health edited ... 1:15-1:25 Break and General Discussion 1:25-1:45 Personal anecdotes from the perspective of a…
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    1:15-1:25 Break and General Discussion
    1:25-1:45 Personal anecdotes from the perspective of a teacher and parent:
    In each of these cases, assumptions were made which determined teacher/school response to students. We need to come back down the ladder of inference and investigate motives and causes in order to provide the best services to our students with mental health challenges.
    From a parent of a student with special needs including physical handicapps and an autism spectrum diagnosis:
    This parent had been struggling to get the teacher to understand the implications of the autism spectrum diagnosis in the classroom. The teacher had no special training in symptoms of autism or dealing with autistic students. A school counselor was planning to talk to the teacher, but the teacher was very experienced in the classroom and had expressed doubts that any additional input would be informative to her. On this occasion, Janey (name changed) was refusing to do a simple cut-out assignment. The students were supposed to cut out cards to be used in a reading game. Every student had a sheet of cards whose perimeters were outlined with dotted lines to assist the cutting process. It was an easy task for first graders. Janey was actually advanced in many areas compared to her peers. Janey was told to cut on the dotted lines to cut out her cards. Janey initially did nothing. When confronted by the teacher, she became increasingly upset. The teacher sent Janey to the office with her cut out work and told her she couldn't return to class until the assignment was finished. When the office staff tried to get her to just cut on the dotted lines, Janey became even more upset. Finally, the parent, Judy (name changed) was called. When Judy arrived, the teacher told her that this was a clear example of the willfull task refusal that she had been seeing in Janey. She told Judy that (more to come) she was going to take a firm line on these sorts of willful refusal behaviors. Judy asked Janey why she wasn't doing the work. Janey said, "I can't". Judy responded saying, "You can cut easily, so why can't you cut this?" Janey told her mom that she couldn't cut the squares out on the dotted lines, because there was no dotted line to the edge of the paper. Judy dashed a little line to the edge of the paper and Janey easily completed the assignment. In this case, Janey's rigidly literal interpretation of the instructions to cut on the dotted lines coupled with her low communitcation skills and her poor problems solving skills resulted in what seemed to her to be an insurmountable conflict. She knew what the teacher wanted her to do, but she believed it was impossible. To her, the teacher was asking her to do the impossible, and it was upsetting. All of those issues, rigid literalism, inadequate communication and problem solving abilities are recognizably autistic difficulties, yet because the teacher was sure that the problem was stubborn task refusal, she didn't even probe to find out what might have been troubling her student. Sometimes the answer is as simple as a dotted line.
    (view changes)
    9:46 am

Friday, June 4

  1. page Prep Time edited ... Conversations Often, teachers are sidetracked by students and staff wanting to have conversat…
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    Conversations
    Often, teachers are sidetracked by students and staff wanting to have conversations. Sometimes these conversations are necessary, but the teacher needs to determine whether they are really worth taking the time. If not, it is important to be able to courteously say no. Interrupting someone is a key skill in conversation, particularly when you want to be respectful. There are a number of interruption techniques you can use to 'grab the baton', taking control of the conversation.
    Prioritize!Action Plan
    Working in a group of 2-3, make a list of those items that most frequently interrupt your prep time and take away from your schedule. Are they brought on by students? Other staff? Things you forgot you had to do? Brainstorm ways you can reduce these interruptions, or reduce the time they steal from you. With your group, come up with an action plan that would remove one or more of these interruptions from your day.
    Prioritize!
    Should you
    ...
    you decide? (We need a resource here, as well)
    TAKEN FROM http://www.mftrou.com/prioritizing-tasks.html

    To fill
    ...
    some water.
    What
    What is the
    ...
    them in….
    Rocks – undertaking big project
    Pebbles – member of club, volunteering, coaching
    Sand – routine chores at work, reading books
    Water - housekeeping, watching movies, surfing the internet

    The most
    ...
    What can Iyou stop doing
    ...
    free up myyour time?
    Select some key time-wasters and assign one to each group of 3-4. The groups will then use the skills discussed to decide on an action plan that could be used to limit the time wasted by that distraction.
    What's

    What's
    on your plate? (hey, group, what do you think about breaking this into two sections? where would you break it and how would you introduce the second part?)
    Working in a group of 2-3, come

    Come
    up with two lists. The firsta list should beof what you
    ...
    prep time. The second list should be those items that most frequently interrupt your prep time and take away from your schedule. Set list #1 aside, we can come back to that. Review list #2 and brainstorm ways you can reduce these interruptions, or reduce the time they steal from you. With your group, come up with an action plan that would remove one or more of these interruptions from your day.
    Now, go back to list #1.
    How many
    ...
    these activities? Come up withCreate a schedule
    ----
    RESOURCES
    (view changes)
    6:46 pm
  2. page prep time links edited http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocol http://www.mftrou.com/prioritizing-tasks.html…
    http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocolhttp://www.mftrou.com/prioritizing-tasks.html
    http://newteachersupport.suite101.com/article.cfm/use_teacher_preparation_time_carefully
    http://www.edutopia.org/learn-masters
    (view changes)
    6:35 pm
  3. page Prep Time edited ... Often, teachers are sidetracked by students and staff wanting to have conversations. Sometimes…
    ...
    Often, teachers are sidetracked by students and staff wanting to have conversations. Sometimes these conversations are necessary, but the teacher needs to determine whether they are really worth taking the time. If not, it is important to be able to courteously say no. Interrupting someone is a key skill in conversation, particularly when you want to be respectful. There are a number of interruption techniques you can use to 'grab the baton', taking control of the conversation.
    Prioritize! Should you just do it now? Should you add it to the to-do list? How do you decide? (We need a resource here, as well)
    TAKEN FROM http://www.mftrou.com/prioritizing-tasks.html:http://www.mftrou.com/prioritizing-tasks.html
    To fill your bucket, first you put in the rocks. Is your bucket full? No, you can fit in some pebbles. Is your bucket full? No, you can fit in some sand. Is your bucket full? No, you can fit in some water.
    What is the moral of this tale? That you can always fit more in? No, if you don’t put the rocks in first, you’ll never get them in….
    ...
    RESOURCES
    Links
    http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocol
    Articles
    Committee Urged To Support Prep Time For Teachers
    (view changes)
    6:33 pm
  4. page prep time links edited http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocol http://newteachersupport.suite101.com/articl…
    http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocol
    http://newteachersupport.suite101.com/article.cfm/use_teacher_preparation_time_carefully
    http://www.edutopia.org/learn-masters
    (view changes)
    6:32 pm
  5. page Prep Time edited ... Instruction in setting meeting protocols. Meetings are the biggest time wasters for many of us…
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    Instruction in setting meeting protocols. Meetings are the biggest time wasters for many of us. We'll address techniques for setting protocols and keeping peers on task.
    {Meeting Protocol Guidelines.docx}
    Interrupting
    Interrupting
    Conversations
    Often, teachers are sidetracked by students and staff wanting to have conversations. Sometimes these conversations are necessary, but
    the teacher needs to determine whether they are really worth taking the other persontime. If not, it is one of theimportant to be able to courteously say no. Interrupting someone is a key skills ofskill in conversation, particularly wherewhen you want to change the other person's mind.
    Interruption techniques
    There
    be respectful. There are a
    ...
    the conversation. Here are some of the common methods available:
    **Agreement Interrupt**: Enthusiastically agree.
    **Body Language Interrupt**: Non-verbal signal intent to butt in.
    **Clarification Interrupt**: Ask for clarification. Check you understand.
    **Continuation Interrupt**: Pick up where they might leave off.
    **Disagreement Interrupt**: Disagree with what is said.
    **Disinterest Interrupt**: Appear disinterested in what they say.
    **Distraction Interrupt**: Become distracted by something else.
    **Encouragement Interrupt**: Keep them talking.
    **External Interrupt**: Use a third party to interrupt.
    **Identity Interrupt**: Prod the identity of the person.
    **Loudmouth Interrupt**: Talk more loudly than the other person.
    **Motormouth Interrupt**: Jumpinandtalkquickly.
    **Question Interrupt**: Just ask them a question.
    **Power Interrupt**: Use your power to grab control.
    **Permission Interrupt**: Ask if you can interrupt.
    **Touch Interrupt**: Touch them gently as you interrupt.
    **'Yes, and' Interrupt**: Say 'Yes, and,...'
    **'Yes, but' Interrupt**: Say 'Yes, but...'
    Articles about Interrupting
    Interrupting can be a tricky subject. Here are some more tips and observations.
    **When to interrupt**: So they let you in and listen.
    **When not to interrupt**: Sometimes it best to listen for a while.
    **When to let others interrupt**: Going the other way.
    **When not to let them interrupt**: Sometimes you need to keep talking.
    **How to stop people interrupting**: Useful when you want to finish.
    **Overlapping speech**: We often start before others stop.
    **Technology and interruption**: It grabs you, doesn't it?
    When to Interrupt
    An important question that you need to know the answer to when you are seeing to interrupt someone else is when to interrupt -- and when to keep quiet and wait.
    When not to interrupt
    Sometimes you can try to interrupt a person who is talking and end up in a battle (which may only take a second) over who is allowed to talk. Sometimes it is just not a good idea.
    Do note, however, that these are all guidelines and not absolutes. Sometime you just have to interrupt!
    When to let others interrupt
    When you are conversing with other people, a question to keep in mind is when you should let others interrupt you. Here are some key points to keep in mind.
    When not to let them interrupt
    Sometimes when other people want to interrupt, it is reasonable to //let them interrupt//. At other times, it is a good idea to hang onto the talking stick. Here are some of those times.
    How to stop people from interrupting
    Sometimes you do not want to be interrupted, perhaps because you have something important to say or perhaps because the other person has kept interrupting you for little good reason beforehand.
    Remember also that interruptions may be to seek or give useful information and that they are a normal part of conversation, and not a slight to your character. Be cautious, then, in how often and when you power through the interruptions of others.
    TAKEN FROM: http://changingminds.org/techniques/conversation/

    Prioritize! Should you just do it now? Should you add it to the to-do list? How do you decide? (We need a resource here, as well)
    TAKEN FROM http://www.mftrou.com/prioritizing-tasks.html:
    ...
    RESOURCES
    Links
    http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocol
    Articles
    Committee Urged To Support Prep Time For Teachers
    (view changes)
    6:31 pm
  6. page Prep Time edited ... Avoid Time-Wasters What are your time-wasters? Disorganized meetings? Constant emails? Studen…
    ...
    Avoid Time-Wasters
    What are your time-wasters? Disorganized meetings? Constant emails? Students asking what they missed last class? Together, we will brainstorm for about 10 minutes a list of all the time-wasters we can think of - the "Urgent and Unimportant" quadrant. Ideas will be written on the board for all to see.
    ...
    peers on task (GROUP - HELP ME FIND RESOURCES WE CAN BORROW FOR THIS)
    MEETING PROTOCOL RESOURCES:
    http://www.sunrise-project.org/files/revised_partnering_protocols.pdf AND
    http://aisweb.wustl.edu/hr/empld.nsf/pages/Protocol
    task.
    {Meeting Protocol Guidelines.docx}

    Interrupting
    Interrupting the the other person is one of the key skills of conversation, particularly where you want to change the other person's mind.
    (view changes)
    6:22 pm
  7. page Textbook Selection Workshop edited ... Curriculum should support a variety of approaches to learning through activities that actively…
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    Curriculum should support a variety of approaches to learning through activities that actively involve the pupil, such as drama, story-telling, art, music, maps and pictures, games, etc. The pupils in any class bring a diverse set of backgrounds, abilities, learning styles, personalities, and personal preferences, all of which affect how that individual pupil will learn best. In addition, studies have shown that exposure to a variety of learning approaches results in significantly better appropriation and retention of concepts and attitudes.
    Consider also curriculum support for children with special needs. Typically material for younger children can be adapted for those with learning disabilities. Availability of supplemental materials for hearing- or visually-impaired children is another consideration. Look for curriculum guidance and suggestions in this area.
    ---------------
    Media - Click to Access
    Agenda
    (view changes)
    12:19 am
  8. page Textbook Selection Workshop edited ... Get involved VIII. Recap (5 minutes) -------- Making The Established Curriculum Work For…
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    Get involved
    VIII. Recap (5 minutes)
    --------
    Making The Established Curriculum Work For You Workshop Details
    Goal:
    ...
    Communicate the district’s vision, goals and long-range plans for curriculum and instruction to staff, students, parents, and the community-at-large.
    Steer district-wide curriculum initiatives, effectively involving administrators and staff in workshops, seminars, program evaluations, and community presentations.
    ...
    teams K-12.
    Develop

    Develop
    and coordinate
    ...
    academic achievement.
    Promote

    Promote
    technological literacy
    ...
    the classroom.
    Develop,

    Develop,
    monitor and
    ...
    Grade 12.
    Plan,

    Plan,
    coordinate and
    ...
    instructional techniques.
    Provide

    Provide
    for the
    ...
    whenever appropriate;
    Maintain

    Maintain
    up-to-date curriculum
    ...
    plans; and
    Work

    Work
    closely with
    ...
    teaching materials.
    Recommend

    Recommend
    to curriculum
    ...
    and assessment.
    Improve

    Improve
    instructional methods,
    ...
    subject areas.
    Promote

    Promote
    mainstreaming of
    ...
    student activities.
    Ensure

    Ensure
    all students
    ...
    physical education.
    Manage

    Manage
    the district’s testing programs.
    Interpret

    Interpret
    state and
    ...
    and community-at-large.
    Maintain

    Maintain
    open communications
    ...
    programmatic issues;
    Represent

    Represent
    the district
    ...
    national organizations;
    Coordinate

    Coordinate
    and administer
    ...
    work activities.
    Selection

    Selection
    and Review Committees:
    Can

    Can
    be at
    ...
    district level.
    Composed

    Composed
    of teachers,
    ...
    select curriculum.
    Often

    Often
    are faced
    ...
    of choices.
    May not have the opportunity to review every option in depth.
    ...
    textbook publishers:
    Textbook publishers cater to the majority. States such as Texas have a strong influence on textbook publishers based on population. It would be too expensive for publishers to create separate editions for each state. So, when a state like Texas adopts new educational policies, these changes filter down into every other state. Even if those policies do not mesh with another state’s policy, that state may have no option but to purchase the textbook written for Texas.
    ...
    Group Breakout:
    Texas

    Texas
    recently adopted
    ...
    studies curriculum.
    Discuss how these changes will affect your classroom, your school, etc. If your school were to purchase new textbooks, how would your teaching have to change? What are some options for compensating for the change?
    ...
    to Consider:
    Good

    Good
    curriculum should
    ...
    Educationally Sound:
    What is the educational philosophy underlying the curriculum plan? It should provide a comprehensive, balanced approach to learning, supporting all age groups in life-long learning. New concepts should build on previously-learned material while challenging the pupil to learn new concepts. Materials should be attractive and inviting, and compare favorably with other learning aids the pupil is accustomed to using in the school setting.
    ...
    Developmentally Appropriate:
    Curriculum for a specific age group should consider the reading skills and other developmental attributes of the learners. Lessons for younger children should avoid symbolism and abstract concepts because they are still concrete thinkers; their minds are not yet capable of abstract thought.
    ...
    Learner Diversity:
    Curriculum should support a variety of approaches to learning through activities that actively involve the pupil, such as drama, story-telling, art, music, maps and pictures, games, etc. The pupils in any class bring a diverse set of backgrounds, abilities, learning styles, personalities, and personal preferences, all of which affect how that individual pupil will learn best. In addition, studies have shown that exposure to a variety of learning approaches results in significantly better appropriation and retention of concepts and attitudes.
    ...
    this area.
    -----------
    Media - Click to Access
    (view changes)
    12:18 am

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